Solanum lycopersicum 'Early girl'

Page last edited 2,447 days 0 hours ago
From WikiGardener
Jump to: navigation, search
Tomato
Early girl
Tomato Early girl.jpg
Scientific Classification
Species: Solanum lycopersicum
Heirloom
Cross.png
Hybrid
Tick.png
Open pol
Cross.png
Plant Data
Time to harvesting: 50-62 days

The Early Girl tomato is a medium globe type F1 hybrid popular with home gardeners because of its early fruit ripening. Early Girl is an indeterminate variety. It is tall growing and needs support as the plant grows. Fruit maturity claims range from 50 to 62 days from transplanting, which appeals to growers in climates with shorter frost-free seasons. (However, the plants of this variety are not particularly cold-tolerant.) Plants are reliable and prolific.

The ripe fruit is about the size and shape of a tennis ball - very much a standard tomato—and weighs ~130g (4-8oz). It has a bright colour and good flavor, but is usually replaced at the table by later-producing varieties which are considered better tasting.

Early Girl VF hybrid is verticillium and fusarium wilt (strain I) resistant. The VFF hybrid is resistant to fusarium wilt strains I & II. The patent holder of the Early Girl variety is Monsanto Corporation following its 2005 acquisition of vegetable and fruit seed company Seminis, Inc.[1][2] An open-pollinated version has also been bred, although it is not widely available.

Cult Following[edit]

Early Girl is well suited to a technique known as 'dry-farming'.[3]

Researchers at the Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems at the University of California, Santa Cruz, are among those who have described the technique: not watering tomatoes after transplanting, forcing the roots to grow deeper to seek out moisture, producing more "concentrated flavor," and saving water.

Dry-farmed Early Girl tomatoes have a cult following, and aficionados claim the taste of dry-farmed Early Girl tomatoes rival those of the best-regarded heirloom tomatoes.[4][5][6][7][8]

History[edit]

Based on a short-season hybrid tomato developed in France, the Early Girl was originally distributed in the United States by PetoSeed Co., a major agricultural seed supplier.[9]

The variety was named "Early Girl" by PetoSeed boardmember Joe Howland to complement the company's popular "Better Boy" tomato. Seed catalog Burpee Seeds struck an exclusive three-year deal for the new variety, and featured it on the cover of its 1975 Spring catalog.[9]

Growing[edit]

Main article: Tomato: Growing

References[edit]

  1. Dillon, M. (2005).More on Monsanto's Acquisition of Seminis, World's Largest Vegetable Seed Company Retrieved: 2010-08-05.
  2. (2505). Monsanto buys Seminis. Retrieved: 2010-08-05.
  3. Swezey, L.B. (1992). The tastiest tomatoes … with the least water. Retrieved: 2010-08-05.
  4. (1996). Genuine Exotic Melons. Retrieved: 2010-08-05.
  5. (2003-2009). PlantFiles: Tomato Lycopersicon lycopersicum 'Early Girl'. Retrieved: 2010-08-05.
  6. (2008). Market Report. Santa Cruz, Calif. Retrieved: 2010-08-05.
  7. (2006). Oh, Oh, Oh, Tomatoes! - Otherwise known as Ode to a Tomato. Retrieved: 2010-08-05.
  8. Glueck, R. (2008). A Visit to Dirty Girl. Retrieved: 2010-08-05.
  9. a b Tracey, D. (1998). Enduring Girl Short-Season Tomato Has Been Popular Since its '70s Debut. T&J Enterprises. Retrieved: 2010-08-05.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
v  d  e
Tomato varieties
Indeterminate Alicante · Brandywine · Cherokee purple · Costoluto fiorentino · Early girl · Gardener's delight · Golden gem · Golden sunrise · Ildi · Marmande · Moneymaker · Orange banana · Orange santa · Red cherry · Shirley · Sweet million · Wapsipinicon peach
Semi-determinate Belle · San marzano
Determinate Roma · Tumbling tom