Celeriac

Page last edited 2,454 days 19 hours ago
From WikiGardener
(Redirected from Celariac)
Jump to: navigation, search
Celeriac
Celeriac-1-.jpg
Scientific Classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(Unranked): Angiosperms
(Unranked): Eudicots
(Unranked): Asterids
Order: Apiales
Family: Apiaceae
Genus: Apium
Species: Apium graveolens rapaceum
Synonyms
Celery root

Knob celery
Monarch

Turnip-rooted celery
Plant Data
Min germination temp: 20°C (68°F)
Max germination temp: 25°C (77°F)
Germination time: 17 days
Time to transplanting: +45 days
Time to harvesting: +100 days
Soil type: Loam
Growing plant spacing: 30cm (12in)
Growing row spacing: 46cm (18in)
References: [1][2]

Celeriac (Apium graveolens rapaceum) is also known as celery root, turnip-rooted celery or knob celery. It is a kind of celery, grown as a root vegetable for its large and bulbous hypocotyl rather than for its stem and leaves. The swollen hypocotyl is typically used when it is about 10–12 cm in diameter; about the size of a large potato. Unlike other root vegetables, which store a large amount of starch, celeriac is only about 5-6% starch by weight.

Planner[edit]

J F M A M J J A S O N D
Sow
Transplant
Lift

Growing[edit]

Location[edit]

Choose a spot which receives a reasonable amount of sun.

Soil[edit]

The soil should be fertile and moisture retentive. Incorporate as much manure or compost as possible. About a week before planting apply a general-purpose fertiliser.[2]

Sowing[edit]

Raise seedlings under glass in early spring. Plant two seeds in a compost filled peat pot. Once seedlings appear, remove the weaker of the two. Harden of seedlings outdoors before planting.[2]

Planting[edit]

Plant young plants still in their peat pots or directly into the soil if not using peat pots. Leave 30cm (12in) between plants and 46cm (18in) between rows.[2]

Aftercare[edit]

Hoe the site regularly and feed plants from occasionally. Add a mulch in early summer to help retain moisture.[2]

Remove side shoots and remove lower leaves to expose the crown from midsummer.[2]

In late September draw soil around the swollen stem-bases.[2]

Harvesting[edit]

Neither flavour nor texture deteriorate with size. Begin lifting in October. In most areas you can cover the roots with straw or peat and lift as required in early spring.[2]

If your soil is heavy and the site is exposed, it is better to lift the crop in November. Twist the tops, cut the roots and store in boxes filled with damp peat. Keep in a cool shed.[2]

Troubles[edit]

Main article: Apiaceae troubles

References[edit]

  1. Celeriac. myfolia. Retrieved: 2010-08-10.
  2. a b c d e f g h i Hessayon, D.G. (2009). The Vegetable & Herb Expert. Transworld Publishers, London. p. 56. ISBN 9780903505468
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
v  d  e
Celeriac varieties
Celeriac